Genf

The Long Road to Justice for the Malaya Lolas

Podiumsdiskussion

10.11.2016, 00:00 Uhr

On 23 November 1944, Japanese troops invaded the district of Mapanique, Candaba in the Philippines. After torturing and killing many inhabitants, the soldiers forced the women and girls to march towards the “Bahay Na Pula” (Red House), the Japanese headquarters. There, the soldiers for weeks repeatedly beat, raped and abused them. Sexual slavery facilities like the Bahay Na Pula had been established all over the Philippines as well as in other countries occupied by Japan during the Second World War.
 
The survivors of these horrific crimes call themselves the “Malaya Lolas” (Free Grandmothers) and have been actively requesting their government for assistance to file a claim for reparations against Japan since 1998. To date, however, Philippine officials have refused to do so. While concerning acts of sexualized violence that happened many decades ago, the Malaya Lolas’ denial of justice has proven to be emblematic for so many other current cases of crimes perpetrated against women in armed conflicts in which high levels of impunity continue to persist.
 
More than 70 years after the atrocities they suffered, many Malaya Lolas have passed away. The few that remain, however, continue to fight to see justice in their lifetime. The Center for International Law Manila (CenterLaw) and the Berlin-based ECCHR are now taking their claim to the UN level.
 
Supported by the Bertha Foundation, survivors, legal representatives and activists will present the Malaya Lolas’ ongoing search for justice at the Right Livelihood Award Foundation:
 
Isabelita Vinuya is the President of the Malaya Lolas and the lead petitioner in the case in the Philippines.
 
Romel Bagares is CenterLaw’s Executive Director and has been representing the Malaya Lolas in the Philippines since 2004.
 
Aileen Reyes Garcia is CenterLaw’s Program Officer and has been accompanying the Malaya Lolas during their political activities in the Philippines.
 
Andreas Schüller heads the International Crimes & Accountability program at ECCHR.
 
Alejandra Muñoz is a legal advisor at ECCHR. Her work focuses mainly on sexualized violence in conflict situations.

Windhoek

Symposium – Koloniales Unrecht und Aufarbeitung

Konferenz

25.03.2019, 18:00 Uhr

Goethe-Institut Namibia
1–5 Fidel Castro Street, P.O.B. 12 08, Windhoek, Namibia

Deutschland und Namibia verbindet durch die Jahre der Kolonialzeit eine besondere Geschichte. Seit 2015 gibt es offizielle Verhandlungen zwischen Namibia und Deutschland, die es zum Ziel haben eine...

Swakopmund , Windhoek

Namibia: Eine Woche für Gerechtigkeit

Veranstaltungsreihe

25.03.2019, 19:00 Uhr

115 Jahre nach dem Genozid an Ovaherero und Nama

Die Rückführung menschlicher Gebeine von Deutschland nach Namibia, die Klage von Herero und Nama vor einem Gericht in den USA, die Restitution in der...

Swakopmund

Internationales Recht in postkolonialen Kontexten

Konferenz

27.03.2019, 12:00 Uhr

Swakopmund Hotel & Entertainment Centre
2 Theo-Ben Gurirab Street, Swakopmund, Namibia

Die Rückführung menschlicher Gebeine von Deutschland nach Namibia, die Klage von Ovaherero und Nama vor einem Gericht in den USA, die Restitution in der Kolonialzeit geraubter Kulturgüter in Museen...

Swakopmund

Der Genozid an Ovaherero und Nama & Restorative Justice

Podiumsdiskussion

29.03.2019, 18:00 Uhr

Swakopmund Hotel & Entertainment Centre
2 Theo-Ben Gurirab Street, Swakopmund, Namibia

Die Auswirkungen der kolonialen Vergangenheit Europas in die postkoloniale Gegenwart werden immer öfter und immer offener diskutiert. So stellt sich die Frage, wie eine wirkliche Aufarbeitung...

Nürnberg

International Summer Course: Human Rights Law in Context

Sommerkurs

22.07.2019, 10:00 Uhr

Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
Lange Gasse 20, 90403 Nürnberg

Das ECCHR organisiert dieses Jahr gemeinsam mit dem Centre for Human Rights Erlangen-Nürnberg (CHREN) eine Summer School mit dem Schwerpunk Wirtschaft und Menschenrechte. Themen werden unter anderem...

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