Berlin

German Liability for US Drone Warfare in Yemen

discussion

15.10.2014, 00:00 Uhr

Faisal bin Ali Jaber, lost two family members in a drone strike in Yemen
Kat Craig, Reprieve
Andreas Schüller, ECCHR

On the evening of 29th August 2012, five rockets fired by US drones struck the village of Khashamir in eastern Yemen. Faisal bin Ali Jaber had travelled back to his village to celebrate a wedding with his extended family. While bin Ali Jaber survived, both his brother-in-law and his nephew were killed in the strike. Other family members suffer from ongoing trauma as a result of the attack. The drone strikes were carried out with the involvement of the US military base in Ramstein in the Rheinland-Pfalz region of Germany. Despite this involvement, the German government continues to deny any responsibility for civilian deaths caused by US drone warfare. Faisal bin Ali Jaber will give an account of the attack and the work he is undertaking in the USA and Europe to bring an end to drone strikes in his home region. Kat Craig, legal director at the international human rights organization Reprieve (London), represents relatives of Yemeni and Pakistani victims of drone warfare. She will discuss the legal action currently being taken by Yemeni claimants in various countries. Andreas Schüller, head of the International Crimes and Accountability program at ECCHR, will examine Germany’s constitutional obligations regarding the use of the Ramstein US airbase to carry out drone strikes. 

Berlin

Deadly dam collapse in Brazil: Are German companies responsible?

discussion

22.10.2019, 19:00 Uhr

Tagungswerk
Lindenstraße 85, 10969 Berlin

In January 2019, a dam burst at an iron ore mine near Brumadinho, Brazil, killing more than 270 people. The toxic sludge polluted large sections of the Paraopeba River, poisoning thousands of people's...

Berlin

Colonial Repercussions V: The Case of Namibia

Symposium

29.11.2019, 14:00 Uhr

Akademie der Künste (AdK)

The issue of (post-)colonial injustice is more present than ever before in German and European legal and cultural policy debates. Still, this development towards addressing the past has not had much...

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